How to inject sparkle into your technical writing

Top tips for writing technical copy

We write copy for a wonderful array of clients, from tiny start-ups to global companies, spanning many industries.  It’s fair to say that not all the topics we deal with are the most exciting to write about.  Technical companies and products (on the face of it) can be dry subjects but when we are tasked with writing technical copy, they present a fascinating challenge to us.

It’s far easier for a copywriter to embellish a story about the latest charity expedition or arts event, much harder to take a technical subject and make it appealing – and most importantly, understandable for the layman.  That’s why many tech companies employ the help of specialist copywriters such as Editing Edge to help them promote their business.

If you work for a tech company and are facing the same problem with your subject matter, my top three writing tips would be to:

1.     Make it as human as possible

Moving away from the technical dry facts into visualising what the product / service actually does, how it makes a difference to the end user.  Use real life examples and tell a story if you can.

2.     Use vibrant language

You can’t necessarily avoid the technical language but remember who your audience is and keep it simple if required. But simple doesn’t mean boring. You can still use emotive, descriptive language to discuss the product features and benefits.

3.     Add exciting imagery

Whether it’s a close-up of the product in a more artistic style, some mocked-up imagery or a picture that illustrates what the product enables the user to do (not just what it is), imagery will bring your technical copy to life even more.

technical writing

To give you a flavour of how we do it at Editing Edge, an example is a press release we created for a Hampshire based innovation company, showcasing their new product: a glove with incredible touch technology.

The press release needed to appeal to a wide audience, from scientists and engineers to gamers and investors. So we avoided tech-speak and provided plenty of real-life examples to let the possibilities of the invention speak for themselves.  Here’s an excerpt:

“Imagine investigating a simulated crime scene for evidence and being able to feel the difference between carpet fibres and hair; imagine being able to simulate administering an epidural into the spine while being able to feel the difference in resistance of an incorrect versus correct positioning. Military training (such as for bomb disposal) is another prime market.”

 “In virtual reality gaming, imagine checking on a fallen comrade in a combat game and being able to feel their temperature, whether they are limp or responsive, bleeding or if they have a pulse. In online gambling, imagine being able to pick up and feel poker chips, playing cards and dice and distinguish the between textures of all three.”

Our client was delighted with the coverage. We received multiple hits from one press release.  You can read more about it here.

If you need some help bringing a technical subject to life, get in touch with us at Editing Edge.